Dior Grapples with the Concept of Consent for Fall/Winter 2020

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On February 24, Harvey Weinstein was found guilty in a pivotal sexual assault and rape case for the #MeToo movement. Let’s not forget how it all started. Tarana Burke launched the term in 2006 on social media, but it took hold in 2017 as women relayed the tremendous abuse they’d suffered at the hands of the immutable and powerful. Weinstein, who has nearly 80 accusers – including Kate Beckinsale and Dior ambassador Cara Delevingn– has finally met justice. One day later, and with the verdict looming large, Dior staged a timely show, with the word “consent” explicitly flashing in neon, suspended above the runway.

For Maria Grazia Chiuri, women’s rights are not a trend, a talking point, or a hot button issue, but her entire raison d’etreEvery single show she has presented as Creative Director of Dior has dealt with intersectional feminism, dismantling the patriarchy, and other discourses on modern womanhood. Naturally, Chiuri enlisted female artists to bring her messaging to the fore – as she does every season. This time, it was a collaboration with the Claire Fontaine collective, a group of women who hail from the Marcel Duchamp school of thought. Duchamp famously rejected traditional modes of art in favor of reactionary “anti-art”. Likewise, this collective has found vivid ways to challenge the establishment with their work.

Photo: Courtesy of Imaxtree

One got the sense that Dior’s young woman is part of the generation tasked with saving the world.

Chiuri’s ideas, which are often lofty, challenging, and necessary, have found their way into Dior’s collections. The ethereal ballerina-esque gowns with their fitted bodices and sheer tulle skirts that were so key to her early days at the house have given way to more practical ensembles. There were hardy double-denim uniforms, plaid separates, and camo jackets indicating that a woman’s work is never done, so she might as well have a wardrobe that will help her accomplish her goals.

Paired with combat boots, fishnet stockings, and silk bandanas, the models took on the aura of schoolgirl militants on their way to dismantle the patriarchy. With neon signs flashing above them that read “Women’s Love Is Unpaid Labor” and “Patriarchy Kills Love”, one got the sense that Dior’s young woman is part of the generation tasked with saving the world. And save it, she shall.

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