Lanvin’s Back, Baby, and It’s Better (and More Different) than Ever

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A new day has dawned at Lanvin. With the arrival of a new parent company, Fosun, and new Creative Director, Bruno Sialelli, comes a whole new outlook for the brand. Olivier Lapidus, who?

Sialelli’s debut collection for Lanvin Fall/Winter 2019 was quickly off to a promising start. The designer, who hails from a background creating menswear for Loewe, pulled similar themes over to Lanvin, and we don’t think that’s necessarily a bad thing. For a brand that has been set adrift without an identity, Sialelli’s strong point of view is entirely welcome, in our opinion.

So, let’s get this out of the way upfront: the collection is terrific but will probably be complained about online because it doesn’t look like “Lanvin”. But what is Lanvin in 2019 except a blank slate? Let’s just choose to accept right up front that this is the house’s new direction. It’s pretty cool, visually interesting, very well designed, and features smart draping and tailoring. What’s not to like?

Photo: Courtesy of Imaxtree

Lanvin is finally heading in the right direction – or at the very least direction.

A perfect example of Lanvin’s refreshed aesthetic in the making was a variety of supple jackets in teal and baby blue that were decorated with sailor’s knots and crown-molding lapels. There was something kind of retro and cool about them, but they still felt modern because we hadn’t seen them anywhere else before. Then came a nice proposition for day: a simple deep V-neck dress worn over monochrome printed trousers – easy and elegant, as were those plaid capes elegantly draped over skirts that were decorated with tinsel fringe.

On the more complex side, Lanvin introduced an intricate intarsia knit top upholstered in multi-colored pom-poms and a fantastic scarf-printed dress depicting medieval scenery, which considered a new proposition on sleeving. Instead of the billowing poet’s sleeves we’re seeing everywhere, Sialelli sliced his open from shoulder to wrist. He didn’t do this on every look, mind you; there were still plenty of fetching, romantic sleeves to be found in the collection. In other places, he injected waists that had been clamped by strange bands of ribbed knitwear, as well as weird layers, as in the case of trousers worn over what looked to be… other trousers?

The collection was also filled with beautiful Lurex pieces, embroidered sheer dresses, lovely trenches, masculine suiting, vivid prints, and really strong accessories. Ignore the peanut gallery on this one folks, and trust us. Lanvin is finally heading in the right direction – or at the very least a direction – and that is all thanks to Sialelli’s willingness to put himself out there.

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