Lanvin’s New Romanticism and “Bad Girl” for Fall/Winter 2017

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For Fall/Winter 2017, Lanvin explored romanticism with a transgressive twist, completing its dreamy, coquettish looks with a touch of “bad girl” styling.

Last season, Bouchra Jarrar debuted her first presentation for Lanvin, a languid, elegant collection depicting her signature moto jackets, suits, and dresses, laced with nods to house founder Jeanne Lanvin. It was roundly received as a success, advancing the Lanvin woman into new territory. For Fall/Winter 2017, Jarrar explored romanticism with a transgressive twist, completing her dreamy, coquettish looks with a touch of “bad girl” styling, like fishnet stockings and flat, functional boots.

Designers have been juxtaposing femininity and masculinity for decades on the runway, so the pairing of a long pure white gown with a high ruffled neck topped and a tough little leather vest was hardly a surprising sight at Lanvin. This might have been the central motif of the presentation, but in Jarrar’s hands it still felt fresh instead of played-out. The success of her methods relied on excellently-cut silhouettes, a simple palette, and subtle subversions – the balance of each creating complete looks that were wholly desirable. You didn’t just want that handsome coat or lace blouse worn by Bella Hadid, you wanted the whole kit-and-caboodle. This is a skill lost on more extravagant designers, but Jarrar measures her aesthetic down to the tiniest granule. Brilliant.

Lanvin Fall/Winter 2017
Photo: Courtesy of WGSN

One had to appreciate the simple seduction of a blush pink jumpsuit with a deep-V front worn with a dreamy coat in the same shade, even if you’d never consider wearing such a thing before. Loveliness pervaded every look, from romantic blouses upholstered with ruffled jabots and slippery chiffon maxi skirts to pristine white suits painted with birds and flowers. Jarrar even presented a new spin on the bomber jacket, in a layered version with a vestlike painted overlay and drawstring hemline. Of anything in the collection, this piece had the most viral potential.

Slip-on and go, the styling is done for you.

Another look which had the markings of a sell-out item were her striped knit jackets, with the stripes made from either filigreed thread, or alternating strips of ivory sequins and an ethnic navy print. An all-white look that appeared to be three separate pieces was another clever must-have, featuring a twist-front sleeveless top, chiffon shrug, and wide-leg trousers, that upon closer inspection turned out to be a single solid unit. Slip-on and go, the styling is done for you. The collection came to rest on a refined final look: a simple plissé maxi worn over white fishnets, topped with a lace sweater and a halo of floral adornment around the shoulders. It was pretty, feminine, and so easy to wear that it created a new category of eveningwear.

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