Moschino Gets Lit for Fall/Winter 2016

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Shockingly, Moschino dispensed with pop culture references for Fall/Winter 2016. That’s right: no McDonald’s, no Spongebob, no Power Puff Girls, and no Barbie.

Shockingly, Moschino dispensed with pop culture references for Fall/Winter 2016. That’s right: no McDonald’s, no Spongebob, no Power Puff Girls, no Barbie, and no ironic comments on consumer culture, branding fever, or celebrity obsession. But the collection was not bereft of humor or irony. Just look at Jeremy Scott’s tongue-in-cheek reference to the classic ‘Le Smoking’ jacket, whose edges had been consumed by flames. Or take a look at Moschino’s parting gift to the audience: a phone cover that looked like a pack of cigarettes emblazoned with the slogan “Fashion Kills” – which was not exactly tasteful and was perhaps even gauche, but at the very least, it was on-message.

Photo: Courtesy of Imaxtree

Why all the smoke and mirrors? Scott’s reference point this season was “The Bonfire of the Vanities”, which gave him plenty of fuel for the fire, but was also a curious literary starting point for a brand you could not accuse of being brainy. Keep that in mind, because by the end of the show, things heat up… literally.

The party atmosphere of the presentation was depicted by a soundtrack of rock and punk tunes, which informed the models’ propensity to dance and wiggle down the runway. An infectiously fun mood filled the venue, and dispelled all notions that Scott had lost his sense of comedy just because he wasn’t name-checking a pop culture icon (or four).

The first look was a leather moto jacket that had been transformed into a maxi dress with a long zippered slit at the side that revealed the dress’s red interior lining. There was lots of leather on display, in fact, found on zippered tops, thigh-high boots, pointed bustiers, elbow-length gloves, and more. Scott also played a lot with proportions, as well as high/low mixes that paired leather booty shorts with maximal royal purple satin sashes that tied around the body and ended in a cape, and workman’s denim paired with teacup skirts. Some of his looks were edgy, tacked with loops of silver chains down the front of solid black dresses, while others were clasped with handcuffs in a reference to authority figures, while some were printed with cigarettes and lips in commentary on addiction.

The addiction theme was celebrated, so if there was a message meant to benefit the greater good, it was lost in smoke.

By the end, the smoking references became literal, as dresses poured down the runway ahead of billowing smoke trails (achieved by implementing smoke machines inside the dresses), some of which were literally scorched with burnt-out patches and hemlines. One of the more impressive (if impractical) looks was a black gown over which Scott had constructed an actual chandelier – a literal reference to Moschino’s “Get Lit” theme.

Addiction seemed to be the theme here, with cigarettes and fashion as the collection’s main vices. It’s tough to say whether or not there was a deeper message at work beyond this surface theme, like for instance, fast fashion’s horrendous effect on the environment and human lives, or nicotine’s devastating effects on the body. The addiction theme was celebrated, so if there was a message meant to benefit the greater good, it was lost in smoke.

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