New York Fashion Week Coverage: Marc Jacobs Fall 2015 Collection

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The era of Marc Jacobs at Louis Vuitton has ended, and over at Marc by Marc Jacobs British designers Katie Hillier and Luella Bartley are interpreting youth culture for the masses. Marc Jacobs, however, is anything but adrift. Having renewed his commitment to his eponymous label, he was firmly anchored to proving himself as sole proprietor of the name. Fall/Winter 2015 was the Jacobs DNA on a catwalk – super-focused, super-gorgeous, and super-irreverent. It’s as if the notorious Jacobs of the 90s had been resurrected, but his new incarnation was more confident and self-assured than ever before. He dabbled in glamorous looks, gothic looks, punk looks, kinky seductive looks, all in one of the runway’s most coherent collection to date.

Jacobs usually takes the audience to some pretty strange places, but there was nothing strange about his Fall/Winter 2015 runway. It was too beautiful to be strange. Nineties model Erin O’Connor launched the show in a punky twisted hairdo – below, she sported slick elbow-length gloves and a fitted plaid dress, but these were modest beginnings. Soon, the plaid was finished with a sheer skirt, and then modesty was blown right out of the building when that look was followed by a completely sheer, embroidered frock. Then it was back to extravagant layers, which looked very monied and opulent. The effect was surreal given the androgynous and cruel beauty of the models.

Photo: Courtesy of Imaxtree

Metallic dresses trimmed with grommets and baroque jackets the texture and hue of raw, freshly extracted gold were the glittering counterparts to Jacobs’ plush, fleecey outerwear. The outerwear soon included fur options and a must-have array of paint-streaked capes, which were paired with outrageous pleated, vinyl-slick leather midi skirts. Jacobs continued with mixed-print separates and also flaunted a really nice elongated silhouette, which came from putting long, fitted jackets over even longer skirts. One can’t help but think that Diana Vreeland, the beloved fashion icon/pioneer that Jacobs name-checked as the driving influence of the show, would be quite taken with his brave and beautiful collection.

Photos: Courtesy of Imaxtree

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