Redefining Etro: Marco De Vincenzo Takes a Creative Leap (and It Pays Off) | Savoir Flair
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Redefining Etro: Marco De Vincenzo Takes a Creative Leap (and It Pays Off)
article ETRO FALL/WINTER 2024 | WGSN
by Grace Gordon 5-minute read February 22, 2024

Etro charts a new path, but respects the confines of its codes.

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In a recent interview with Savoir Flair, Etro’s Creative Director, Marco De Vincenzo, made an interesting comment, “Etro is famous for paisley, but paisley isn't enough to build a story.” He went on to explain how he and his team wanted to do a black coat, something without paisley. Maybe it feels limiting to be within a certain boundary all of the time. I can only imagine how much of a challenge it must be for a designer to arrive at a well-established brand with a long legacy and strong codes, how it must feel like a puzzle to keep the codes and find new interpretations within them over and over again. If you don’t, you could be accused of destroying the brand DNA, you could alienate clients, and you could set back your profits by huge margins. It’s a risk to do a black coat when paisley is the thing your brand is known for. “Every coat is a treasure and a limit at the same time,” he explained. But no risk, no reward.

For this reason, the huge masks that were erected within the show space felt especially personal and symbolic, as did the show’s name: Etro Act. In Greek storytelling tradition, actors wear masks to make the emotional interior of their characters evident to the audience. A mask can be both a protective shield and a revealing layer. At Etro Fall/Winter 2024, they are the latter. It’s a beautiful thing that De Vincenzo, whose high emotional IQ allows him the confidence to reveal his interior state, can be vulnerable like this at a time where fashion branding calls for cold, calculating cynicism. With the idea of masks, with Act, De Vincenzo exposes the challenge of interpretation, its limitations, and the revelry in finding a way to chart a new path through well-trod territory. He calls it a “Homeric journey” in the show notes, and fabrics, textures, and personal instincts are what guided him as he “[diverged] from a set path to explore new creative avenues.”

This meant an Etro collection unlike any other. With its first-ever co-ed show, De Vincenzo focused on the beauty of tactility. This meant cozy layers and knitwear, handsome coats splashed with foiled metallic paisley prints that were scaled up, bolero jackets, fleece-lined vests, rusted leathers, and jacquard body stockings designed in collaboration with Wolford. Knee socks, scarves, neckerchiefs, and feathery boas added even more visual interest to the collection’s surfeit of layers and patterns. The richness of Etro’s fabrics and the depth of its interplay of patterns and colors affirmed De Vincenzo’s design skills. From his brilliant debut to this assured collection, the designer has clearly mastered the art of interpretation.

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It’s a beautiful thing that De Vincenzo, whose HIGH emotional IQ allows him the confidence to reveal his interior state, can be vulnerable like this at a time where fashion branding calls for cold, calculating cynicism

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