Why You Should Put Sharm el-Sheikh Back on Your Bucket List

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Prior to 2015, Sharm el-Sheikh was a shoo-in for holidaymakers. Sandy beaches studded with thatched umbrellas, balmy temperatures, and clear ocean waters spiked with colorful reefs – you couldn’t go wrong. Now, the region is hoping to return to those halcyon days, especially as direct flights from the UK have recently resumed (they were stopped after the bombing of a Russian airliner in 2015). But why put Sharm el-Sheikh back on your bucket list? We’re glad you asked.

 

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It’s Not Overrun with Tourists

Yes, Britons are slowly returning to the region, but the numbers are not at its heyday peak, translating to more uninterrupted beach time for you and your family. The upcoming Spring months are the best time to visit, with 11 to 12 hours of sunshine per day guaranteeing plenty of opportunities to be out and about before the scorching summer arrives. Bonus: this is also the best time for travelers interested in scuba diving; sea visibility is at its clearest and water temperatures hover around 23°C.

There's Still Plenty of Water Sports

Speaking of which: even if all-inclusive package deals and poolside lounging isn’t for you, Sharm el-Sheikh has, well, other charms – namely its diving and snorkeling opportunities. Explore the dive wreck of SS Thistlegorm, a huge cargo ship sunk during World War II (you can still spot motorbikes and trucks within its hold), or swim amongst the magical gorgonian forest (an underwater coral forest) of Ras Um Sid.

 

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It's Working Hard on Its Eco-Credentials

Sharm el-Sheikh has not always had the most sustainable reputation, but changes are being made. There are plans afoot, in association with the United Nations Development Program, to turn the resort town into an eco-friendly haven – and even announce it as a green city. A well-supported plastic ban is predicted to be rolled out, while more than ever before is being done in terms of recycling and waste-management infrastructure.

It Serves As a Base for Exploration

You don’t have to stay within the confines of your hotel – the resort town can be a great base if you plan to see other spots on the Sinai Peninsula. Dahab, an hour north, is another famed Red Sea diving spot (it’s well-known for its Blue Hole dive site, a submarine sinkhole) and arguably far more low-key than Sharm el-Sheikh. Meanwhile, a short drive will take you to Ras Mohammed National Park, which combines desert and coral-fringed ocean and is rife with wildlife.

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